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Cross-border knowledge sharing is power

Jim McGee in Managing for shared awareness about Enterprise Effectiveness

Interesting thinking about what lessons are to be learned from the military about sharing information in real-time or near real-time:

Shared information inside a corporation and with its allies and customers provides greater information richness and reach, and produces shared awareness. Shared awareness in turn enables faster operational tempo and sustainable competitive advantage. This all spells increased competitiveness

An interesting transition from “need to know” to “shared awareness” Hierarchical organizations spend inordinate time and effort trying to work out precise boundaries on who needs to know what and when. Ostensibly about minimizing demands on people throughout the organization, it’s really about the exercise of power and control.

And Stephen Downes about Napsterize Your Knowledge: Give To Receive (here)

The primary lesson: “The more that a company shares its knowledge, the more valuable it becomes.” It’s astonishing how many people still don’t believe this. But when I look back at the success my website and OLDaily have brought me – despite my lack of any obvious qualifications in the field – it is self evidently true. When you share your knowledge, you share your ability, and this is what makes you or your company more valuable. People prefer to hire or contract for services based on proven ability nearly every time. Moreoever, the more you share, the more people share in return (many of the items in OLDaily are the result of submissions from readers), which increases your personal or corporate knowledge base. Anyhow, this article discusses some of the benefits of sharing knowledge and then offers some advice on how to do it.

I wonder if someone does research with large companies about cross-border knolwedge sharing? I believe in its power, but it would be nice to have more arguments to convince others.


Later: more in Sharing vs. hoarding knowledge by Jim McGee

Archived version of this entry is available at http://blog.mathemagenic.com/2003/01/24.html#a427; comments are here.

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